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TomB
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Joined: 8/3/15
Posts: 10
Removing the Prop

Has anyone had to remove their prop from the shaft.  When I hauled my boat in October, I found the three shaft zincs severely corroded and some damage on the edge of one blade.  My boat is on a mooring so the galvanic corrosion is from my boat only.  Besides searching for the source of the current on my boat in the spring, I decided to pull my prop and have it repaired this winter.

 Removing the nut and locking nut on the shaft was easy.  I rented a very heavy duty brass C-clamp prop remover and with the generous application of heat from my propane torch and some sharp blows to the hub from a brass chisel, I was very Unsuccessful in removing the prop.  In fact I bent the C-clamp out of shape.  Aside from paying the marina $115/hour for what could be an expensive operation, I am at a loss for my next step. 

Has anyone removed their prop?  Does anyone have any suggestions or helpful advice??  I know the cold weather here in RI is not helping nor is the fact that the prop has been on for 32 years.  Hopefully there are no prop set screws or any other considerations. 
Thanks for any advice.
 

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pkeyser
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Joined: 5/18/13
Posts: 450

Tom-
I had a similar experience. I hated to declare defeat, but I got the wallet out and called in a guy who had a much bigger C-clamp and does this for a living. In the end, I didn't incurr damage to the prop, line cutter, strut, shaft or transmission bearings so maybe it was the cheaper approach. In hopes of being able to perform the task by myself in the future, I greased the shaft before prop reinstallation. Not sure it will help, but we will see. I thought about applying some Teflon plumber tape but didn't want to risk even the slightest of prop/shaft misalignment. Maybe others have ideas.

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Chachere
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Joined: 10/27/10
Posts: 667

I've removed the 3-blade fixed prop on our boat a few times over the decade we've had her, and never found it that difficult (but I have no idea how long since it had last been removed the first time I did so).   I bought one of those 3-arm pulley puller tools from an auto-parts store, something like in the photo below.  
I won't venture to speculate as to why yours is so stuck, but I would suggest being careful with any hammer blows, as you don't want to transmit those impacts to the transmission bearings (you could disconnect the coupling if needed, so as to isolate). 

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Haro
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Joined: 11/7/14
Posts: 273

Yes, I used the same type of steering wheel puller and worked easily. To make future removal easy I applied lana-coat.
I have not removed it for about 5 years so I am not sure if it made it easier

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pkeyser
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Joined: 5/18/13
Posts: 450

If you use this type of puller, you'll need to utilize 3 large hose clamps over the arms to keep the fingers in securely in place on the prop hub.  You may also have to drill a small dimple in the center of the prop shaft to create a place for the bolt nipple to seat. Wear safety glasses and gloves. Experience talking here. A correctly sized C-clamp prop puller is the better way to go.

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Siler Starum
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Joined: 4/20/18
Posts: 58

My experience: With a good 3-arm puller, putting good tension on it... heat a bit and give it some good hits with a big hammer and leave it for a beer and a night. Next morning one hit with the hammer, big bang and propeller loose.
Give it time, stay friendly and give it love...
 

TomB
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Joined: 8/3/15
Posts: 10

Thank you all for the great tips.  The three point puller doesn't look nearly as strong as the Heavy Duty C-clamp brass prop puller that I bent out of shape trying to pull the prop.  (To tighten the clamp I put a 4 foot pipe on my wrench to turn the puller bolt.).  And the prop and shaft are such a heat sink that my propane torch really did not heat the prop much.  I sure hope my prop strikes didn't do harm to the transmission. 
So I may have to bite the bullet and ask the marina to do the job.  (cringe)
Thank you for all your help.
Tom

 

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