Hatch Rebedding

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SFahab
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Joined: 12/22/21
Posts: 2
Hatch Rebedding

Greetings! First time posting. I am the new owner of a 2000 36 mkii. And thanks to the torrential rains in the SF bay area lately I have discovered that all of my hatches need rebedding ASAP.

I've already watched countless hours of youtube videos and read many forum threads in various places about the merits and disadvantages of various sealants. Tentatively planning on using 4000 UV unless everyone things that is a bad idea. But mostly Id like to know what Catalina used to bond them in the first place? Was it 5200? Butyl? I purchased the boat from the original owner and I'm certain he has never serviced any of these hatches so the sealant is likely original.

Im hoping to start tackling the project over new years but have been unable to source Debed spray locally which I am told is the only decent way to loosen 5200, If thats what I'm likely to find I'd prefer to wait until I can get some Debed through the mail.

Thanks!

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pkeyser
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Posts: 531

I personally like, and have used Boat Life Polysulfide Caulking to re-bed hatches.  Others seem to prefer Butyl tape. One advantage of Polysulfide is you can seal the cabin roof core when the hatch is removed (or use epoxy).

I would suggest not using 3M 5200 because it will make for very difficult removal if you ever need to replace the hatch.
I have not had to re-bed any hatches on our 2005 C36, but did on our 1986 C30. I found Catalina had used a sealant/caulk (unknown brand) on the C30. The hatches were readily removed by removing the inside trim and topside screws and then pushing up on one side of the hatch from inside the cabin. Don't try to push up on the entire hatch, just one side. Inserting a putty knife between frame and exterior cabin roof might also be helpful. I'm assuming the C36 and C30 are similarly designed in the hatch areas.

Paul & Wendy Keyser
"First Light"
Newburyport MA/Rye NH
2005 C36 MKII #2257
Wing, M35B

SFahab
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Joined: 12/22/21
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Yeah, I'm not planning on using 5200 myself, just worried about whether I can expect to be removing it when I start the job if that's what Catalina used originally. Sounds like that's not the case, which is good news. Sounds like I should be able to just use some kind of scraper and some acetone to clean the surfaces for re-sealing instead of waiting until I can get ahold of debed spray. Thanks!

True Wind
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Joined: 7/15/12
Posts: 116

I have replaced the lens in all my opening hatches. I have used butyl tape. I just replaced the lens in my forward Lewmar ocean trapezoid hatch and I bed the hatch. I used butyl tape. We did a short outside sail a few days ago and got our butts kicked and none of the hatches are leaking. If you use 5200, 4200 or even 4000 and you find it leaks after the material sets up....good luck removing it.

2003 Catalina 36

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dlincoln3
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I'm not 100% sure of what they used, but it appears to be a polysulfide caulk of some sort, very similar to Life Seal.  I used DeBond Marine Formula on it when I went to rebed all of my hatches on my 1993, and it easily dissolved the adhesive properties of whatever they used.  As mentioned previously, make sure to epoxy the exposed plywood core while you're doing this job.  It will save a ton of hassle down the road if you're keeping the boat.  

Don Lincoln
"Nancy Lynn"
1993 Catalina MK1.5, Hull 1238
LaSalle, MI (Lake Erie)
Universal M-35AC

pierview
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Joined: 9/27/09
Posts: 536

I just resealed the head hatch and I agree with everything everyone else posted. Not hard to break the hatch loose but I found I needed more  than a paint scrapper,. I found a weak spot under the frame and tapped a paint scrapper into that spot, usually at an angle. I was then able to drive the paint scrapper in under the edge of the hatch at an angle to break more loose. I worked around the hatch that way.

When it came time to pry the hatch out, I found the paint scrapper bent too much (even though the sealant under the edge is broken, there is sealant that seeped down between the edge of the hatch and the hatch that holds it down)  so, I lifted an edge with the paint scrapper and then, and you'd have to be old enough to remember the old shoe brakes on cars, I used an old brake adjusting tool to to leverage the hatch up. This tool has a  flat side like a  flat head screw driver but has an upward angle bend in the shaft that allows downward pressure which is hard to get with a straight screw driver.

I used that spray softener mentioned by others on residual sealant on the fiberglass and the hatch frame to get it clean and then reset with Boat Life (or Seal), I can never remember which unless I'm looking at the tube.... that's my DRS kicking in. 

I thought of using butyl but the hatch itself is recessed with a ridge in the middle and I thought I'd have to try to put in too many layers of the tape. I reused Boat Life (or Seal) by layering a thick ring around the deck opening and the hatch rim. I put masking tape around the deck opening and around the hatch. When I reinserted the hatch, a lot oozed out all around but with the taped off areas I was able to use the rounded corners of a plastic fiberglass filler applicator and got a nice, neat seam .

Because I live 10 minutes from the boat I tend to do jobs in small bits but overall, unless you have an unusual problem, I'd think the whole job shouldn't take more than a couple of hours. 

Chuck Parker
HelenRita 2072 Mk II
2002 Tall Rig - Winged Keel
Atlantic Highlands, NJ

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pkeyser
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Posts: 531

Thank goodness for the old brake spoon. Glad I still have one in the toolbox!

Paul & Wendy Keyser
"First Light"
Newburyport MA/Rye NH
2005 C36 MKII #2257
Wing, M35B

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