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Bill Colmer's picture
Bill Colmer
Last seen: 6 years 6 months ago
Joined: 6/28/09
Posts: 15
Accidental Jibe preventer

I'm looking for sizing information about an accidental jibe preventer vs. a Boom Brake.
I live in an area where there are constant severe wind shifts and I have witnessed an accidental jibe and the results of one that broke the mast in half. I do not want to have my mast broken or worse yet, someone's head, so I am considering either a block and tackle type jibe preventer or a Boom brake. I like the idea of the block and tackle just so I could have some way to hoist a man overboard back on deck, but a Boom brake looks like it'd be a nice idea because i wouldn't have to go forward after each (intentional) jibe to reset it. I'm looking for any input, actual experience and/or opinions that would help me decide which way to go. Also, I have no idea how to size a preventer made of block and tackle. I already have a solid boom vang, so I don't necessarily need the same strength that the vang would require, although the setup would work fine as a preventer. Any comments will be appreciated.

1988 Catalina 36 Hull #862
"Heart of Gold"

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1988 Catalina 36 Hull #862
"Heart of Gold"
Ndemauro's picture
Ndemauro
Last seen: 1 year 12 months ago
Joined: 4/6/09
Posts: 53

I use a shockle with a line on it for the preventer (you can get them at West Marine). This worked really well all through Mexico and saved me a couple times. You'll have to move the line from side to side as you jibe but that's not a big deal.

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Nancy
Cat's Meow #2046
San Francisco
2002 MK II
deising's picture
deising
Last seen: 9 months 1 day ago
Joined: 11/3/08
Posts: 1351

I have never used a boom brake, but the obvious advantage (assuming they always work as expected) is that it is there at all times and requires no action on your part.

It has been a rare occurrence that I have done this, but on each side of the boat I ran a 1/2 nylon line forward from the stern cleat to the bow cleat, through the inside "hole" of the cleat, and made it fast to the boom end bail. Once on a jibe, you tension that side while letting slack the other. When you jibe again, you slack one and tension the other.

That does not require you to leave the cockpit.

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Duane Ising - Past Commodore (2011-2012)
s/v Diva Di
1999 Catalina 36 Hull #1777
Std rig; wing keel, M35B, Delta (45#)
Punta Gorda, FL
http://www.sailblogs.com/member/diva-di/

windward1
Last seen: 4 years 4 months ago
Joined: 9/18/09
Posts: 146

I just bought a snatch block to make up a better preventor than what I had previously rigged up. I was planning running a line from the boom bail to the block attached to the bow cleat and back to the cockpit. That way I can ease or tighten it easily from the cockpit. Does that sound reasonably.

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Richard
1994 C36 Tall Rig M1.5
Waukegan Harbor
Lake Michigan

deising's picture
deising
Last seen: 9 months 1 day ago
Joined: 11/3/08
Posts: 1351

Using a block is a good idea, but I just let the line run around the polished curve of the cleat since it is not intended to run fast or under load.

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Duane Ising - Past Commodore (2011-2012)
s/v Diva Di
1999 Catalina 36 Hull #1777
Std rig; wing keel, M35B, Delta (45#)
Punta Gorda, FL
http://www.sailblogs.com/member/diva-di/

Pgutierrez's picture
Pgutierrez
Last seen: 1 week 1 day ago
Joined: 5/14/12
Posts: 136

Good sailing Father’s Day to all.  
Please share pictures or diagrams of your accidental jibe protector.
Thanks.  

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peter g

2000 C36, MK2, Hull. #1897
wonderful, wonderful, wonderful ! ! !.   5 th Catalina

 

 

Pgutierrez's picture
Pgutierrez
Last seen: 1 week 1 day ago
Joined: 5/14/12
Posts: 136

Hey, found excellent you tube video on rigging accidental jibe protector:
https://youtu.be/qAhUWCa-KoQ

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peter g

2000 C36, MK2, Hull. #1897
wonderful, wonderful, wonderful ! ! !.   5 th Catalina

 

 

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