Outfitting for Extended Cruising

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Lanealoha
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Joined: 2/13/20
Posts: 60
Outfitting for Extended Cruising

First I'd like to say that I have read the numerous post here regarding our boats characteristics for 'Bluewater' sailing and the many owners thoughts on this.  There is quite a range of thoughts on this and there is quite a bit of inspiring posts based on first hand experience (Ron Kyles etc.) which makes me confident in my intended journey.  While I do not plan to cross any of the major oceans at this point in my planning, you never know where the wind might take us.  

We are the proud 3rd owners of an 1988 C-36 berthed in Channel Islands Harbor in Oxnard, Ca.  We have had her for 2 years, in which time we have done quite a bit of work as I will list.  

1)  Replaced all opening ports and re-bedded (obviously)

2)  re-bedded all chainplate covers on the deck

3)  added a larger bow roller and 45lb Mantus anchor with 150' of chain and 200' of 8 plait rode

4)  electric windlass with wired control and wireless remote 

5)  New heavier 'offshore' main sail with 2 reef points

6)  ditched dutchman system and added lazy/ ez jacks

7)  New MFD/ chartplotter

8)  Radar and Garhauer Radar post stern mounted with engine hoist

9)  push pit mounted Life Raft

10)  Dinghy and motor

11)  running rigging (still more to do but will get done this winter)

12)  new bilge pumps (thoughts on adding them to port and starboard sides as to work while heeled?)

13)  compost head, removed holding tank and all associated plumbing in order to open up more storage         relieve demands on electrical system 

14)  New lifeline AGM batteries  for hous bank and increased AH (should probably change the starting battery as well)

15)  removed propane tank from aft lazzarette, upgraded to Composite with more capacity and push pit mounted in order to free up storage in Lazarrette

16)  added proper backing plates to pulpit and pushpit (G-10)

17)  re-did deck paint with new non-slip (Total Boat product)

18)  cleaned and diinfected all water tanks

19)  cleaned and inspected genoa

20)  new gaskets on both hatches ( think I need to replace the forward hatch as one of the nylon 'pins' of the hinge is protruding quite a bit and for the life of me I cannot get it to budge back into position

21)  New LI and solar powered cooler/ refer which runs on LI power bank that can be used to charge electronics as well.  The nav desk chair has been removed the cooler is in its own compartment which can slide out to access and the chair has been mounted back to the top of this compartment.  ( it required no new attachment points so can easily be converted back to original configuration)

22)  refer to port of galley sink/ top loading

23)  stuffing box/ gland re-packed and new pedro hose, new cutlass bearing

24)  removed single center mounted bow clete and added 2, 1 on both stbd and port side of bow w/ G 10 backing plate

25)  G 10 backing plates on stern mounted cletes

There may be more I can't rattle off right now.

On my short list to do is to/ inspect:

1)  replace/ upgrade standing rigging

2)  Alternative charging/ power source ( Solar, Wind?)

3)  Engine over haul, valve adjustment

4)  new wind and depth instruments as I can't read the display on depth very well and new displays are not much cheaper than new system so thinking I should just upgrade so mnfg will be same across the board on my electronic suite

5)  Steering system overhaul

6)  proper backing plates (g 10) on stanchions

7)  figure out best way to new run reefing lines ( don't really care if they go back to cock pit)

8)  figure out best system for rigging spinnaker as has no system currently, but do have a nice un-used asym

9)  Water maker/ de salinator, looking at a new LI powered portable system from seawater pro, this way I can take it with me if and when I get my dream boat and also as to not place more burden on my house bank

We would love other suggestions and thoughts, things I may have missed as I just rattled this off the top of my head.

Our plan is to start with taking a year off ( I don't think its enough time, wife is open for more depending on how it all goes).  Head south slowly next August down southern Ca, down coast of Baja ( I've previously sailed to La Paz from San Diego) spending September and October in Bahia Asucion, and mostly Scorpion Bay surfing and keeping a keen eye on the weather and hurricane forecast, if needed with good forecasting and preparation we can head north to Turtle Bay in the event a Cane' decides it wants to re-curve into the peninsula.  I've been plotting huricanes for the last 4 years, I feel confident in this plan with that and based on historical data.  End of October when the Bajahaha passes by we're gonna chase them to La Paz and spend some time in the Sea of Cortez before crossing to main land Mexico and working our way south over the winter.  Eventually making our way to El Salvador before the start of the new Hurricane season and on to spend summer in southern Costa Rica and pacific islands of Panama surfing, diving, fishing and exploring.  I realize this is also the rainy season and when the south swell season is at its peak.  Thinking Golfito and the Golfo Dulce region.  When fall sets in head east through the canal and winter in Carribean Panama etc....

I would love some insight mostly on boat prep and things I may have left off in those regards, as well as any points of interest and must do's must haves.

Cheers!  I hope to have some responses and look forward to it!!

Dave

 

David Lane
S/V Grace
88' Catalina 36'
Oxnard, Ca
 

Sojourn's picture
Sojourn
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Joined: 7/14/08
Posts: 101

Hi David,

Pretty complete list.  A couple of items.  On your first list, #24:  Keep the bow cleat, but add the other two cleats.  First, the extra cleat has two advantages, First,  if you are required to use the rope portion of the anchor rode, you'll have a place to cleat without going to the other cleat off center.  Secondly, it is also good place to set a snubber, don't use a bridal snubber as the boat swings from side to side, there will be a greater chance of chafing of the line.  I'm set up that way for years and have had, no problems.

As to batteries.  I have Lifeline AGM batteries.  I have 31 series batteries, two are equal to one of the 4D size, but splits the weight for easier handling.  Lifeline makes a 31XT battery which is 125 amp-hrs, 20 more amp-hrs, than the standard 31 series.  All are 12 DC.  I have 2 banks of two batteries (each 250 amp-hrs) and 1 series 27 starting battery.  I have 172 amp-hrs of solar panels, If I were to replace them , I'd go to 240 amp-hrs. or greater.

Item #4.  Do added a chain stopper in front of the windlass.

Add a lifeline in the cockpit, athwart ship for the helmsman.  Other life lines should go only as far back as necessary to be able to attache to from the cockpit, not anny further.
  
Wish you luck,

Lou

 

Lou Bruska
Sojourn
1985 C-36 Mk-I TR #495
Eldean Shipyard
Lake Macatawa (Holland, MI) Lake Michigan
Rallyback@comcast.net

Lanealoha
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Joined: 2/13/20
Posts: 60

Ya, I always wondered how cleteing the rope rode off to the side would run if I had to do that, I usually anchor in abot 25-30 water and just let out all my chain then use a bridal.  Will put center bow clete back, good point.  Also you mention a chain stopper in front of the windlass, are you referring to one of those little channel like do dads that has a pin you put through a chain link to hold the anchor instead of riding on the windlass?  If so I currently use a piece of cord to do that job but it is kind of in the way and not super streamlined, I agree that would be better.  I recently up grade to lifeline AGM GPl-4CT 6V at 220ah, I have 4, 2 under each starboard settes rigged in series then paralleled for 440ah.  Should get a new starter as well.

When you say 'lifeline' in the cockpit did you mean 'jack lines'?

My first list of 25 items are things that have all been completed.  There is a shorter list of 8 or so items that I would be interested in some others thoughts as to that.

I appreciate your response, those are hard to come by around here.

Dave

David Lane
S/V Grace
88' Catalina 36'
Oxnard, Ca
 

Sojourn's picture
Sojourn
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Joined: 7/14/08
Posts: 101

Dave,

The chain stopper is a dedicated device to protect the windlass clutch while at anchor.

Maxwell Stainless Steel Chain Stopper | Defender Marine  

You are correct, I meant jackline.

Lou

Lou Bruska
Sojourn
1985 C-36 Mk-I TR #495
Eldean Shipyard
Lake Macatawa (Holland, MI) Lake Michigan
Rallyback@comcast.net

Lanealoha
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Joined: 2/13/20
Posts: 60

Why wouldn't I just use this, since when at anchor even if just chain I'm bridled or using a snubber to a clete?  This would do the job of securing the anchor under way so the windlas is not loaded.  

Lewmar Stainless Steel Anchor Lock defender marine

David Lane
S/V Grace
88' Catalina 36'
Oxnard, Ca
 

Sojourn's picture
Sojourn
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Joined: 7/14/08
Posts: 101

Hi David,
The chain snubber is designed to be able to be opened to retrieve the chain by simply using the windless.  The item you have is solely designed to secure a stored the chain while sailing.  If there is surge or high winds, the small pin can potentially bend making it impossible to pull the pin out if the bridle fails.

As for the bridle, a single line is better, as you won't incur the possibility chafe of the lines or bow if you swing side to side.  In fact, at any give time, you'll only be using on side of the bridle at a time, hence, you're using only a single line snubber.  Bridles work best on catamarans to keep the boat centered on the rode.

As for securing the anchor while sailing, I use a small length of wire and snap shackle to secure the chain in the locker and a small line attached to a bow shackle at the retrieving hole on the anchor and tie it off on the center cleat.  That keeps the anchor from jumping around on bow roller.

The bow shackle's primary purpose is to for retrieval of a fouled anchor.  We use a float marker to either identify the anchor location for us or neighboring boats.  For the float we use 12" round buoy with a block attached to the eye of the buoy.  This allows for a 2:1 purchase, one leg attached to the anchor and the other to a 3lb. deep sea SS weight.  We use 40' of 1/4" line which is strong enough to pull on the anchor.  The 2:1 purchase allows the float to position itself directly or nearly so regardless of the depth of the water.

My fingers are hurting, I'll stop now.

Lou

Lou Bruska
Sojourn
1985 C-36 Mk-I TR #495
Eldean Shipyard
Lake Macatawa (Holland, MI) Lake Michigan
Rallyback@comcast.net

Lanealoha
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Joined: 2/13/20
Posts: 60

Thanks.  I get it.  Happy thanksgiving.

David Lane
S/V Grace
88' Catalina 36'
Oxnard, Ca
 

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sidthekid
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Joined: 6/1/16
Posts: 25

Hello, do you know when your standing rigging was last replaced? Rule of thumb is 10 years depending on use, conditions etc. New standing rigging provides a significant measure of confidence in strong winds and heavy seas.

Solar power (we have 2 135w panels on an arch) is great to keep energy usage on the positive side. For extended cruising a wind generator would provide charging at alternate times and conditions (dark and windy).

Good luck with your cruise!

Bill & Barb
s/v Northern Lights
2002 Catalina 36 MKII #2086
Rock Hall, MD
Northern Chesapeake

Lanealoha
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Joined: 2/13/20
Posts: 60

Standing rigging replacement is on the list, along with solar etc.   Only have a dodger so trying to figure out exactly where to put a few panels.....

David Lane
S/V Grace
88' Catalina 36'
Oxnard, Ca
 

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